Dominant bosses can be bad for groups – so why do they succeed?

28-Feb-2018 9:48 AM

Power-hungry, coercive and arrogant, dominant leaders are more likely to exhibit narcissistic or psychopathic behaviours and to view people as either allies or foes.

Power-hungry, coercive and arrogant, dominant leaders are more likely to exhibit narcissistic or psychopathic behaviours and to view people as either allies or foes.
 
On the other hand people who use prestige as a leadership strategy exhibit traits such as humility, agreeableness and conscientiousness.
 
So why are prestigious leaders sometimes spurned in favour of a dominant leader?
 
Professor of Psychology at Florida State University Jon Maner will give a public lecture this week at the University of Auckland focusing on the science of leadership and the two most common strategies leaders employ – dominance and prestige.
 
His work looks at the interface of social psychology and evolutionary biology and the ways in which social motives influence how we navigate social hierarchies.
 
This talk looks at the most recent research on how different styles of leadership have very different implications for the functioning and wellbeing of groups and organisations.
 
Professor Maner has published more than 130 research papers and book chapters and his work is funded from the United States National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health.
 
He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science.
 
This public lecture is free and all are welcome.
 
Where: Large Chemistry Lecture Theatre, Building 301, 23 Symonds St, Auckland
 
When: Thursday 1 March at 6.15pm
 
Light refreshments will be served at Psychology Reception Foyer, Level 2, Building 302 at 5.30pm
 
Media contact:
 
Anne Beston l Media Relations Advisor, Communications, University of Auckland
Email: a.beston@auckland.ac.nz, Tel: +64 9 923 3258, Mobile: + 64 (0) 21 970 089

Topic: Science

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